COVID-19 Vaccine Information

When you have the option to receive the COVID-19 vaccine, we encourage you to get vaccinated. Our position is based on the latest scientific data—which favor the vaccine as a safe and powerful way to stop the spread of COVID-19.

For the latest information from Cedars-Sinai on the COVID-19 vaccine, please click here.

COVID-19 Updates from Cedars-Sinai

What Our Patients Need To Know Now

At present, we don't know exactly when we will be able to offer vaccines to our patients. We do want you to know—with complete confidence—that when we are authorized to proceed, we will notify our patients immediately. To be prepared for scheduling your vaccine when it is available to you:

  • Log in to your My CS-Link account to make sure you remember your password and have access. This is the fastest, most reliable way to get up-to-date information about the vaccination process and will help streamline appointments when scheduling becomes available.
  • We'll reach out when it's your turn to get the vaccine. Vaccinating our thousands of patients will take time, and we appreciate your patience. 
  • If you don't already have a My CS-Link account, register at mycslink.org or by downloading the Cedars-Sinai app from the Apple App Store or Google Play. If you need help registering, call 1-855-427-5465.  
  • When your turn arrives, you will be able to easily schedule your vaccine appointments in My CS-Link.  

Don't Relax On Covid-19 Safety Guidelines

Even after receiving both doses of the vaccine, you should continue to wear a mask and practice physical distancing as we don't yet know if it will stop you from spreading the virus to others.

An important word about Cedars-Sinai physicians: Their offices are not yet able to schedule vaccine appointments. Meanwhile, during this most challenging time, they are going above and beyond to care for their patients. We are asking everyone to help by not calling them with questions about the vaccine. We are all grateful for your support.

Vaccine FAQ

Our COVID-19 vaccine FAQ reflects current knowledge and understanding. Things are evolving quickly, so please check this page often to get the most up-to-date information.

Following guidance from the Centers for Disease Control (CDC) and at the direction of the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health, we are currently giving the vaccine to frontline healthcare workers who elect to receive the voluntary vaccinations. Additional information on the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health's distribution plan can be found here.

We are preparing to vaccinate our patients as soon as we are able. We are waiting for specific guidance from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health on when and how to implement vaccines, as directed by California Governor Gavin Newsom. Decisions about vaccine administration are determined by Los Angeles County and we are in daily communication with our colleagues at the county’s Department of Public Health. 

Both the Pfizer (PDF) and Moderna (PDF) vaccines have received emergency use authorization (EUA) from the FDA. During times of emergency, such as a global pandemic, the FDA can issue an EUA to provide more timely access to critical medicine. For a vaccine to receive this approval, it must pass rigorous scientific and regulatory processes that demonstrate its safety and effectiveness. 

Cedars-Sinai encourages anyone who has the option to receive the COVID-19 vaccine to get vaccinated. Our position is based on the latest scientific data—which favor the vaccine as a safe and powerful way to stop the spread of COVID-19. 

Scientific evidence shows that when people are vaccinated against a disease, they protect themselves and others. When enough people in a population are vaccinated, their large numbers help protect the entire community, creating herd immunity.

It usually takes about two weeks for immunity to develop following vaccination, but the specific timeline for any COVID-19 vaccine also will depend on which type of vaccine it is. The Pfizer vaccine requires a second dose at least 21 days after the first dose. The Moderna vaccine requires a second dose at least 28 days after the first dose. You must get the second dose to receive the full effect of the vaccine.

Currently, studies of the Pfizer and Moderna vaccines have seen the vaccine may reduce the risk of developing symptomatic COVID-19 by more than 90%. In some cases, vaccines may protect against severe infection but may not prevent mild or asymptomatic infection. If this happens, an infected person who has been vaccinated could still spread the virus. Even after being vaccinated, you will need to continue wearing a face mask and practicing physical distancing.

One of the key public health benefits of vaccines, generally speaking, is their ability to reduce transmission. However, studies to date have not determined whether the COVID-19 vaccine can prevent transmission of the virus. The CDC strongly recommends that people who have been vaccinated continue to use all available tools to stop the spread of the virus. This means that people should continue to wear masks and practice physical distancing after vaccination, until we learn more about how the vaccine helps reduce transmission risk. 

Health authorities won't know how long immunity lasts until they have more data to examine how well the vaccination works. This is an important aspect of COVID-19 that experts are eager to study.

According to early analyses, the two most advanced vaccine candidates—Pfizer and Moderna—reported no significant safety concerns. The majority of side effects were mild to moderate (injection site pain, fatigue, headaches or muscle aches). As with any medication, there is always a very small risk of allergic reactions. In England, the first country to give the Pfizer vaccine emergency use authorization, a regulatory agency issued a warning that people with a history of serious allergic reactions should not get the vaccine. We won't know definitively all possible side effects until studies are complete and the data are made available by the FDA and the manufacturer. We do know there is a small risk of side effects associated with all vaccines, but the side effects are often less serious than the diseases themselves.

The FDA applies the same stringent review process to all vaccines. Approval or authorization of a vaccine by the FDA means that the agency has determined, based on substantial evidence and a stringent review process, that the vaccine is safe and effective for its intended use.

There are currently no data on the safety of the COVID-19 vaccines in pregnant or breastfeeding women. However, pregnant women are at high risk for COVID-19 complications. If you are pregnant or breastfeeding, we encourage you to talk with your obstetrician or healthcare provider. We understand some women may be more comfortable waiting for vaccination until after they have delivered or are no longer lactating. If you choose to wait, you will still have access to the vaccine per your prioritization group when you are ready. For more information, please visit our blog post: COVID-19 Vaccine and Pregnancy

Additional information about the vaccine from the Los Angeles County Department of Public Health can be found here.

Even if you've had COVID-19, it is recommended that you receive the vaccine to further strengthen your immunity to the virus. If you are currently infected with COVID-19, wait to get vaccinated until after your illness has improved and you are no longer infectious. You may receive the vaccine any time after you've recovered from illness. However, because reinfection is uncommon in the 90 days after infection, you may consider delaying vaccination until the end of the 90-day period. This guidance also applies to those who developed COVID-19 after their first vaccination dose. 

Yes. The CDC strongly recommends that people who have been vaccinated continue to use all available tools to stop the spread of the virus until we learn more about how the vaccine helps reduce transmission risk. This means that people should continue to wear masks, as well as practice good hand-washing and physical distancing after vaccination.