COVID-19 (Coronavirus)

GI Motility Clinical Trials

As a patient at Cedars-Sinai, you will have access to the latest clinical trials and research for GI motility. Backed by a respected team of specialists and researchers, our clinical trials aim to further the advancement of diagnosing and treating your GI motility condition.

Questions? See the Clinical Trials FAQs.

Condition:

Colonic Inertia

Key Inclusion Criteria

  • Patients with colonic inertia
  • At least 18 years old

Summary:

The purpose of this pilot study is to identify the causes of a condition called colonic inertia, which involves severe constipation. Often, colonic inertia can only be treated by surgery to remove almost the entire colon (large bowel). Researchers aim to determine whether colonic inertia can be caused by changes in the types of microbes (bugs) that are present in the colon, or possibly by a toxin (poison) produced by particular microbes. Understanding the causes of colonic inertia is the first step in developing future treatments. Participants will be asked to provide stool samples when they are able to, as well as complete a questionnaire.

Condition:

Irritable bowel syndrome

Key Inclusion Criteria (IBS participants):

  • Must meet Rome II criteria
    • At least 12 weeks of abdominal discomfort or pain that has two of three features:
      • Relieved with defecation and/or
      • Onset associated with a change in frequency of stool and/or
      • Onset associated with a change in form (appearance) of stool

Summary:

The purpose of this study is to understand the causes of irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) by looking at both genetic and immunologic mechanisms. Examination of DNA will enable researchers to understand which gene(s) contributes to the development of IBS. In this study, researchers aim to create a bank of blood for future genetic analyses to identify specific genes responsible for IBS development. They also aim to identify possible tests, such as looking for antibodies (which act as an immune defense) to food poisoning toxins, to help diagnose and evaluate the likelihood that they lead to IBS.

Condition

Small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, diarrhea

Participant Requirements

  • At least 18 years old

Summary

The purpose of this study is to find ways to decrease levels of a gas called hydrogen sulfide.  Hydrogen sulfide gas is made by microbes (bugs) in the gut and is linked to small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). SIBO is a condition in which there is an excess amount of microbes within the gut (specifically, the small intestine), which can lead to symptoms such as abdominal pain and diarrhea. Researchers aim to test various ways of decreasing levels of the microbes that produce hydrogen sulfide gas, and therefore provide relief from SIBO symptoms.

Condition:

Gastrointestinal symptoms

Key Inclusion Criteria:

  • At least 18 years old
  • New patient visit with a dietician at Cedars-Sinai or University of Michigan
  • Access to modern device supporting iOS (tablets, iPads, iPhones, and Android) and internet access

Summary:

This study focuses on patients who are scheduled to see a dietician at a future appointment as part of routine clinical care. The purpose of the study is to evaluate the impact of the My Nutritional Health Application. This mobile app allows individuals to maintain a food diary and track gastrointestinal (GI) symptoms through the Food and Symptoms Tracker (FAST). Researchers aim to examine the relationship between participants’ GI symptoms and food. Once participants have downloaded the app, they will be prompted to answer questions related to food intake and mental or physical symptoms that may suggest food intolerance. A member of the study team will reach out to participants to assist with any technical difficulties or to answer questions.

Condition:

Irritable bowel syndrome

Inclusion Criteria:

  • 18-75 years old
  • Meets Rome IV criteria for IBS-D or IBS-M
  • Participants should report urgency with bowel movement at least once a week

Summary:

This study focuses on individuals who have had chronic diarrhea for at least the past three months and who are at least 18 years old. The purpose of the study is to examine how well the antibiotic rifaximin (xifaxan) works in patients who have visceral hypersensitivity caused by irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) or mixed irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-M).  Visceral hypersensitivity is the term used to describe internal pain (mainly abdominal pain and rectal pain) in patients with IBS. Researchers aim to determine whether rifaximin helps decrease visceral hypersensitivity and whether decreases in visceral hypersensitivity are associated with decreases in small intestinal bacterial overgrowth (SIBO). SIBO is a common condition in patients with IBS.  

Condition

Irritable bowel syndrome, diarrhea

Participant Requirements

  • 18-75 years old
  • Meets Rome IV criteria (diagnostic criteria) for IBS-D and meets other specific criteria to progress to treatment phase
  • Colonoscopy must have been completed within the past 10 years

Summary

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the investigational use of a combination of a drug called rifaximin and a dietary supplement, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), in patients with irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D). Researchers aim to determine whether using a combination of rifaximin and NAC will more effectively decrease IBS-D symptoms than using rifaximin alone.

Condition

Gastrointestinal disorders

Participant Requirements

  • 18-85 years old
  • Undergoing oral double balloon endoscopy or esophagogastroduodenoscopy
  • Must not have had any colon prep

Summary

This study focuses on patients who are undergoing either an oral double balloon endoscopy procedure or an esophagogastroduodenoscopy procedure as part of their clinical care. The purpose of the study is to understand how microorganisms in the gut affect individuals and how they may contribute to gut-related human diseases.