Quality Measures–Heart

The Smidt Heart Institute continually monitors the volume and quality of procedures done at the Institute. The team strives to deliver top-quality of care to all patients. As part of this responsibility, we are committed to providing transparency across heart transplant graft and patient survival rates, as well as outcome of care measures for Medicare patients with heart related conditions.

All of these reports aim to reduce ambiguity in outcome data, providing patients and their loved ones the information they need to make decisions with utmost confidence regarding their medical care.

Heart Attack & Heart Failure

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which collects these data, considers 30-day readmission rates to be an "outcome of care" measure. They show what happened after patients with certain conditions received care at a medical center. Such measures show how well a hospital is doing in preventing complications, educating patients about their care needs and helping patients make a smooth transition from the hospital to home or another type of care facility.

It should be noted that some readmissions are appropriate and medically necessary1. The goal regarding readmissions and quality patient care is to assure that patient spends no more time in the hospital than is appropriate and medically necessary for their condition and health status.

Readmission rates are limited to people who have Medicare and who are 65 years old or older, and are "risk-adjusted," taking into consideration how sick the patients were when they were first admitted to the hospital.

The charts below compare Cedars-Sinai with the national rates. For all charts, a lower observed readmission rate is better than a higher one.

Heart Attack

The rate at which patients being treated for a heart attack needed to be readmitted to Cedars-Sinai was statistically no different than that of the U.S. national rate during the reporting period.

Heart Failure

The rate at which patients being treated for heart failure needed to be readmitted to Cedars-Sinai was statistically no different than that of the U.S. national rate during the reporting period.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, which collects these data, considers 30-day mortality rates to be an "outcome of care" measure. They show what happened after patients with certain conditions received care at a medical center.

Such measures show whether a hospital is doing well at preventing complications, educating patients about their care needs and helping patients make a smooth transition from the hospital to home or another type of care facility.

Mortality rates are limited to people who have Medicare and who are 65 years old or older, and are "risk-adjusted," taking into consideration how sick the patients were when they were first admitted to the hospital.

The charts below compare Cedars-Sinai with the national rates. For all charts, a lower observed mortality rate is better than a higher one.

Heart Attack

Cedars-Sinai is one of 41 hospitals in the United States with mortality rates from heart attack that are statistically significantly lower than the national average. Among California hospitals, only Cedars-Sinai and two other hospitals have rates lower than the national average.

Heart Failure
Heart Failure 30-Day Mortality Rates

Cedars-Sinai is one of 186 hospitals in the United States with mortality rates from heart failure that are statistically significantly lower than the national average. Among California hospitals, we are among 28 hospitals that have lower rates than the national average.

Transplant

View our Heart Transplant Measures.

Have Questions or Need Help?

Call the Quality Measures team Monday through Friday, 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Pacific Time (U.S.), or send us a message.